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Syria's Assad Raises Possibility Of Conflict With U.S. Forces, Allies


Syrian President Bashar al-Assad

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has raised the possibility of conflict between his army and U.S. forces in Syria if they do not withdraw from the country soon -- prompting a warning from the Pentagon.

In an interview with Russia's RT television on May 31, Assad asserted that he is willing to negotiate with Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) that are allied with and embedded with U.S. forces and currently hold about one-quarter of Syria's territory.

But he said he will reclaim their territory by force, if necessary.

"The only problem left in Syria is the SDF," Assad told RT, adding he sees "two options" for solving the "problem."

"The first one: We started now opening doors for negotiations. Because the majority of them are Syrians, supposedly they like their country. They don't like to be puppets to any foreigners," Assad said in English.

"We have one option: to live with each other as Syrians. If not, we're going to resort...to liberating those areas by force."

Assad added that "the Americans should leave." He said Washington should learn a "lesson" from its experience in Iraq.

"People will not accept foreigners in this region anymore," he said.

Assad's threat to use force against U.S. allies in Syria and about 2,000 American troops providing them with air support and training prompted a warning from the Pentagon.

"Any interested party in Syria should understand that attacking U.S. forces or our coalition partners will be a bad policy," Lieutenant General Kenneth McKenzie, director of the Joint Staff, said at a press conference in Washington on May 31.

The U.S. State Department also said that while Washington is not seeking conflict with Syria, it would use "necessary and proportionate force" to defend U.S. and partner forces, which have teamed up to fight Islamic State militants in the region.

Meanwhile, SDF spokesman Gabriel Kino replied to Assad's remarks by saying the Syrian Kurdish-led militia would "fight back fiercely" against "any attack."

'"But we all know that a new battle will not do any good for anyone," Kino said on June 1. "It will just add more miseries to the people of Syria."

In the RT interview, Assad responded sharply to U.S. President Donald Trump's recent description of him as an "animal," saying, "What you say is what you are."

Backed by Russian air power and Iranian and Hizbullah militias on the ground, Assad's forces have gained significant ground in recent months in the seven-year civil war that has killed an estimated half a million people and driven another 5 million abroad as refugees.

After regaining control of Syria's two largest cities -- Aleppo and Damascus -- Assad this spring set his sights on areas in the country that remain outside his control and in rebel hands.

The Kurdish militia group SDF that is backed by the United States holds the largest area of Syrian territory outside government control, but it has tried to avoid direct clashes with the government during the multisided war.

Kino Gabriel, a spokesman for the SDF, said in response to Assad's comments that a military solution would "lead to more losses and destruction and difficulties for the Syrian people."

The SDF wants a "democratic system based on diversity, equality, freedom, and justice" for all the country's ethnic and religious groups, he said in a voice message to Reuters.

Assad in the RT interview also sought to minimize the extent of Iran's presence in Syria. Israel, which is alarmed by what it claims is a growing Iranian military presence in Syria, has recently destroyed dozens of military sites that it claimed were occupied and used by Iranian forces and Hizbullah militias.

But Assad said Iran's presence in Syria has been limited to officers assisting the army. Apparently referring to a May 10 air strike by Israel, Assad said: "We had tens of Syrian martyrs and wounded soldiers, not a single Iranian casualty."

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, an independent Britain-based war-monitoring group, has said at least 68 Iranians and pro-Iranian forces have been killed in Israeli air strikes since April.

With reporting by AP, AFP, dpa, and Reuters
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