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FBI Agents Search Home Of Ex-Trump Campaign Chairman


Paul Manafort (file photo)

The FBI has searched one of the homes of President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, amid an ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the presidential election.

Manafort's spokesman, Jason Maloni, said on August 9 that federal agents "executed a search warrant at one of Mr. Manafort's residences."

Manafort has “consistently cooperated with law enforcement and other serious inquiries and did so on this occasion as well," Maloni added, without giving further details.

Citing people familiar with the investigation, The Washington Post, which first reported the raid, said agents working with Special Counsel Robert Mueller conducted a predawn search on July 26 at Manafort's home in Alexandria, Virginia.

The New York Times, citing a person briefed on the matter, said the agents took away tax documents and foreign banking records.

Manafort is at the center of several investigations into possible ties between Russia and Trump's campaign.

Mueller, who leads the FBI investigation, has declined to comment on the raid, which was conducted after Manafort met a congressional panel that is also investigating Russia's alleged influence on the 2016 election.

U.S. intelligence agencies assess that the Kremlin ordered a hacking and propaganda campaign aimed at hurting Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton's campaign.

Trump has denied any collusion with Russia.

As part of the FBI investigation, Mueller is scrutinizing Manafort’s role in the Trump campaign as well as his dealings in Ukraine.

Manafort stepped down as Trump's election campaign chief in August 2016, following reports about his lobbying work for a pro-Russian Ukrainian political party and failure to register as a foreign agent.

He has denied any wrongdoing.

Manafort has handed over files to the Senate Judiciary Committee and the Senate and House Intelligence Committees for their respective Russia investigations.

The files reportedly include notes he took during a meeting with Donald Trump Jr., the president's son, and a Russian lawyer in June 2016.

Reports said e-mails from Trump Jr. show the meeting was set up to discuss potentially damaging information about Clinton.

With reporting by AP, AFP, Reuters, and the BBC
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