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Ex-Trump Security Adviser Flynn Seeks Immunity In Russia Probes


Former U.S. National Security Adviser Michael Flynn (file photo)

Michael Flynn, who was dismissed as President Donald Trump's national security adviser, has told officials that he is willing to answer questions from congressional committees in return for immunity from "unfair prosecution" in the investigation over the Trump campaign's potential ties to Russia.

Flynn's attorney, Robert Kelner, on March 30 said his client "certainly has a story to tell, and he very much wants to tell it, should the circumstances permit."

The comments follow a report by The Wall Street Journal that Flynn was willing to talk to FBI and congressional investigators in exchange for immunity from prosecution.

In his comments, Kelner did not mention whether Flynn was offering to talk to the FBI as well as the committees.

The FBI and the House and Senate intelligence committees are investigating Flynn's ties to Russia.

The congressional committees are probing Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election and any links between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin.

The Wall Street Journal reported that the FBI and the intelligence committees have not yet not granted immunity to Flynn.

The report said it wasn't clear what Flynn had offered to testify about.

It quoted one official as saying, however, that the fact he was seeking immunity suggested he believes he may be in legal jeopardy.

Flynn was forced out as national security adviser on February 13 after revelations that he misled Vice President Mike Pence about discussing sanctions with Russia's ambassador to the United States, Sergei Kislyak, during the transition period before Trump was inaugurated.

Documents also show that Flynn was paid more than $67,000 by Russian companies before the U.S. presidential election.

Based on reporting by CNN, Reuters, and AP
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